Willow Park Wines and Spirits

Chateau Figeac, 2016
Bordeaux Futures Pre-Sale - St Emilion - 100 Pts WA

Chateau Figeac, 2016
Wine Specs
Vintage
2016
Varietal
Bordeaux Red Blends
Appellation
Bordeaux
Alcohol %
13
Wine Spectator
98
Wine Enthusiast
99
Wine Advocate
100
Item Ships: Sep 30, 2019
2016 Bordeaux Future Pre-Sale - 100 Pts WA
In Stock
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$332.99
/ 1 Bottle
SKU: 6016036
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$1,997.94
/ Case of 6
 

The 2016 Figeac is a blend of 36% Merlot, 26% Cabernet Franc and 38% Cabernet Sauvignon, picked from 23 September until 20 October at 49 hectoliters per hectare with 13.9% alcohol. The acidity is 3.67 pH, and it matured in 100% new oak (focused on five cooperages). This is a property that opened a new chapter in 2013, when Michel Rolland's services as a master blender have been called upon and engendered far greater harmony between the three grape varieties, now all singing from the same hymn sheet. It has a crisp blackberry nose, a little closed at first, opening nicely in the glass and offering raspberry coulis, pencil box and subtle mint aromas—classic Figeac in many ways. The palate is extraordinarily well balanced with a fine lattice of tannin sculpted to perfection. There is a slight edginess to this Figeac that I adore, the Cabernets very expressive, more so than the 2015, with graphite infusing every pore of the black fruit. This Figeac has an outstanding structure and a saline finish that beckons you back for another sip. The 2015 Figeac was stunning and the 2016 no less. Tasted on four separate occasions, and in the end, only one (banded) score became inevitable.
Barrel Sample: 98-100 Points Wine Advocate

Wine Specs
Vintage
2016
Varietal
Bordeaux Red Blends
Appellation
Bordeaux
Alcohol %
13
Wine Spectator
98
Wine Enthusiast
99
Wine Advocate
100
Wine Profile
Tasting Notes
The 2016 Figeac is a blend of 36% Merlot, 26% Cabernet Franc and 38% Cabernet Sauvignon, picked from 23 September until 20 October at 49 hectoliters per hectare with 13.9% alcohol. The acidity is 3.67 pH, and it matured in 100% new oak (focused on five cooperages). This is a property that opened a new chapter in 2013, when Michel Rolland's services as a master blender have been called upon and engendered far greater harmony between the three grape varieties, now all singing from the same hymn sheet. It has a crisp blackberry nose, a little closed at first, opening nicely in the glass and offering raspberry coulis, pencil box and subtle mint aromas—classic Figeac in many ways. The palate is extraordinarily well balanced with a fine lattice of tannin sculpted to perfection. There is a slight edginess to this Figeac that I adore, the Cabernets very expressive, more so than the 2015, with graphite infusing every pore of the black fruit. This Figeac has an outstanding structure and a saline finish that beckons you back for another sip. The 2015 Figeac was stunning and the 2016 no less. Tasted on four separate occasions, and in the end, only one (banded) score became inevitable. Barrel Sample: 98-100 Points Wine Advocate
Ratings
This aromatic wine is magnificent in its balance and richness. With its high proportion of Cabernet Sauvignon (38%), it is so typical of this estate. The tannins are velvety while packing a firm punch. Dark and concentrated, it is a great wine for long-term aging. Barrel Sample: 97-99 Points Wine Enthusiast
Awards
Tight and backward, with a wall of cocoa and loam out front, but the core of cassis and blackberry fruit is prodigious, and the mix of charcoal, tobacco and warm paving stone notes making up the finish cuts a seriously wide swath. This needs to be tamed by its élevage though. Barrel Sample: 95-98 Points Wine Spectator
Winemaker Notes
Blend: 38% Cabernet Sauvignon, 36% Merlot, 26% Cabernet Franc
Other Notes
In Roman times, the estate belonged to a family called Figeacus, whose main villa stood on the site of the present château. Traces of the original pipework remain. The Roman remains are currently being studied using infrared photography. The name of the estate and that of the town of Figeac (in the Lot) would appear to have the same origin. The town of Figeac grew up close to the river Lot. There are still a number of small doors and windows from the Middle Ages in the right wing of the château, dating from around 1000. It was early in the 18th century that winegrowing really began at Figeac, under the aegis of the Marquis de Carle. His son, Elie, known as "The Knight of the Vines", became one of the pioneers of the winegrowing revolution in the Libourne area, on which the great prestige of the vineyards of St. Emilion is founded. He aimed the grands vins of Figeac at a select clientele living mainly in northern France. Exemplary care was taken with this thriving vineyard; the wines proved very successful and were very expensive.
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